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Lake Salem water levels drop as renovations begin and boat access is cut | Local

A lake wall is a retaining wall that prevents shoreline erosion. Hege said that over the past 40 years, the Salem Lake metal bulkhead has suffered erosion in the back, requiring current repairs.

The water level only dropped slightly on Tuesday when the drawdown began, but started to rise on Wednesday afternoon and is expected to continue at a faster rate now, Hege said. The water release should be gradual and is also affected by any amount of rain received, Hege said.

The work at Salem Lake is the second phase of the work which began with the construction of a new marina and other attractions. Upgrades are all paid for from the proceeds of bonds approved by city voters.

In the second phase of the work, Bar Construction Co. of Greensboro is carrying out construction at a cost of $ 2.2 million. Since bids were lower than estimated, the city was able to expand the scope of work to include asphalt paving on the new parking lot, cover the playground parking lot with asphalt, and build 12 boat ramps. in the water on the new floating dock rather than six.

Other work planned for this phase includes work on gravel roads and sidewalks, a rubber safety surface for the playground, benches, lighting and landscaping in addition to repairing partitions and from the launching ramp.

Levels of Lake Salem are lowered before the works



City officials say there is a method behind the timing of the Lake Salem closures: The closures allow asphalt work to take place now before cold weather sets in and asphalt factories close for the winter. If the city were to wait until spring and warmer weather, Hege said, it could delay completion of the work.


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Four unique multi-storey car parks on Bahrain’s Pearling Path

The structures which together can accommodate nearly 1,000 cars on a built area of ​​approximately 45,000 m² were designed by the greatest Swiss architect Christian Kerez.

The pioneering prototype in the region is aimed at visitors and local residents of Muharraq, a pearl-story town that boasts the 3.5 km Pearl Trail, one of two UNESCO cultural heritage sites.

The path listed as “Pearling, Testimony of an Island Economy” by the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities (Baca) connects three oyster beds in the northern waters of Bahrain, a segment of the coast and Fort Bu Maher on the seafront and 17 historic buildings.

Mr Kerez, in an exclusive interview with GDN, said he wanted projects to stand out from the routine space used to park cars. He wanted to design a public space with curved slabs going from concave to convex, smoothly from level to level, giving the user a three-dimensional experience.

“Unfortunately, most of the parking lots are very monotonous, acting as simple storage space for cars with a few exceptions like a circular or elongated ramp,” he said.

“I thought it could be something different, not just a monotonous space where you go up and down, but an experience where everything goes up and down. This is what led us to this expression, both sculptural and conceptual.

“Instead of asking people to ‘be careful’ when they park their cars, we want to tell them to ‘enjoy the ride’.

“It will be a very unique parking lot and a basic idea which we hope will be a prototype for other countries to copy.”

Of the three remaining structures, one located behind Al Hilal Hospital is a single driveway while the other two are located near Al Alawi House; one has a geometry that reflects simple shells and the other is a bit more complex and dramatic that can be converted into a theater, concert space, or markets.

In this, the driving sequence begins with a sculptural tube-like extension of the lowest point of the slab, followed by an opening in the corner of the next floor, and this feeling is repeated on subsequent floors.

“Some people call it the shape of a shell or an oyster,” Mr. Kerez said.

“It will be something that you have never seen before but to which you will apply different meanings. We hope there will be other interpretations as well.

Mr. Kerez acknowledged the support of Baca General Manager Shaikha Mai bint Mohammed Al Khalifa, Deputy Commissioner Noura Al Sayeh and Head of Restoration Engineering Services Mustafa Alsulaiman.

“I have been here at least 10 times and enjoy it every time. Bahrain was a discovery for me and after my first visit I wondered why I hadn’t heard of it at school.

“The rich history, the incredible burial mounds, the Dilmun culture – that’s quite a discovery.”

Mr Kerez is also designing the Bahrain pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai which runs from October 1 this year to March 31 next year.

He described the structure made up of 126 steel columns, each 24m high and 11cm wide on the theme “Density weaves opportunities” as an “architectural oasis”.

[email protected]

© Copyright 2020 www.gdnonline.com

(Image: gdnimages / 20210907 20210907230738NouveauProjet-2021-09-07T230559.850.jpg)

WORK continues on four unique multi-storey car parks at one of Bahrain’s most prestigious heritage sites, which will also serve as space to host concerts, prayers and markets.

The structures feature curved slabs that create a continuous transition from one level to another; the four projects follow the same architectural concept, where the slabs go from concave to convex, touching each other and creating a continuous spatial transition.

One of the structures connected to the Muharraq Pearl Trail, located at the intersection of two main roads in front of the house of Shaikh Isa Bin Ali, known as the Palace of the Winds, is expected to open in December of this year, while the others will be opened by June of next year.

The structures which together can accommodate nearly 1,000 cars on a built area of ​​approximately 45,000 m² were designed by the greatest Swiss architect Christian Kerez.

The pioneering prototype in the region is aimed at visitors and local residents of Muharraq, a pearl story town that boasts the 3.5 km Pearl Trail, one of two UNESCO cultural heritage sites.

The path listed as “Pearling, Testimony of an Island Economy” by the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities (Baca) connects three oyster beds in the northern waters of Bahrain, a segment of the coast and Fort Bu Maher on the seafront and 17 historic buildings.

Mr Kerez, in an exclusive interview with GDN, said he wanted projects to stand out from the routine space used to park cars. He wanted to design a public space with curved slabs going from concave to convex, smoothly from level to level, giving the user a three-dimensional experience.

“Unfortunately, most of the parking lots are very monotonous, acting as simple storage space for cars with a few exceptions like a circular or elongated ramp,” he said.

“I thought it could be something different, not just a monotonous space where you go up and down, but an experience where everything goes up and down. This is what led us to this expression, both sculptural and conceptual.

“Instead of asking people to ‘be careful’ when they park their cars, we want to tell them to ‘enjoy the ride’.

“It will be a very unique parking lot and a basic idea which we hope will be a prototype for other countries to copy.”

Of the three remaining structures, one located behind Al Hilal Hospital is a single driveway while the other two are located near Al Alawi House; one has a geometry that reflects simple shells and the other is a bit more complex and dramatic that can be converted into a theater, concert space, or markets.

In this, the driving sequence begins with a sculptural tube-like extension of the lowest point of the slab, followed by an opening in the corner of the next floor, and this feeling is repeated on subsequent floors.

“Some people call it the shape of a shell or an oyster,” Mr. Kerez said.

“It will be something that you have never seen before but to which you will apply different meanings. We hope there will be other interpretations as well.

Mr. Kerez acknowledged the support of Baca General Manager Shaikha Mai bint Mohammed Al Khalifa, Deputy Commissioner Noura Al Sayeh and Head of Restoration Engineering Services Mustafa Alsulaiman.

“I have been here at least 10 times and enjoy it every time. Bahrain was a discovery for me and after my first visit I wondered why I hadn’t heard of it at school.

“The rich history, the incredible burial mounds, the Dilmun culture – that’s quite a discovery.”

Mr Kerez is also designing the Bahrain pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai which runs from October 1 this year to March 31 next year.

He described the structure made up of 126 steel columns, each 24m high and 11cm wide on the theme “Density weaves opportunities” as an “architectural oasis”.

[email protected]

© Copyright 2020 www.gdnonline.com

Copyright 2021 Al Hilal Publishing and Marketing Group Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).


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Cougar Who Was Kept As Illegal Pet Removed From New York Home, And More From This Week’s Weirdest News | Weird






This photo provided by the Bronx Zoo in New York shows an 11-month-old, 80-pound cougar that was removed from an apartment in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City, where she was illegally kept as a pet, have animal welfare officials said Monday. , August 30, 2021. The cougar, nicknamed Sasha, spent the weekend at the Bronx Zoo receiving veterinary care and is now heading to the Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas, officials said.


HONS


NEW YORK (AP) – An 80-pound cougar has been pulled from a New York City apartment where she was being illegally held as a pet, animal welfare officials said on Monday.

The owner of the 11-month-old female cougar returned the animal on Thursday, Kelly Donithan, director of animal disaster response for the Humane Society of the United States, said in a press release.

The cougar, nicknamed Sasha, spent the weekend at the Bronx Zoo receiving veterinary care and is now heading to the Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas, officials said.

The Humane Society has coordinated with zoo officials, the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation, and the New York City Police Department on the elimination of the big cat.

“I’ve never seen a cougar in the wild, but I’ve seen them on a leash, run over in cages and crying for their mothers when breeders pull them off,” Humane Society’s Donithan said. “I also saw the owners’ grief, as in this case after selling not only a wild animal, but a false dream that they could make a good ‘pet’.

Donithan said this cougar was relatively lucky because her owners, who live in the Bronx, recognized that a feral cat was not fit to live in an apartment and abandoned her.

“The tears of the owner and the nervous chirps of the cougar as we hunted her painfully bring home the many victims of this horrific trade and the myth that wild animals belong anywhere but nature,” said Donithan.

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said that while cougars “may look cute and cuddly when they are young, these animals can become unpredictable and dangerous as they grow older.”

Bronx Zoo director Jim Breheny said the exotic animal trade is not helping the conservation of endangered species.

“These animals often find themselves in very bad situations, cared for by individuals who do not have the resources, facilities, knowledge or expertise to meet the most basic needs of the animals,” Breheny said. “In addition to these animal welfare concerns, the keeping of big cats by individuals poses a real danger to the safety of the owner, his family and the community in general. “

New York has seen other notable cases involving dangerous animals in private residences, including Ming, a 400-pound tiger who was removed from a Harlem apartment in 2003.

Ming’s owner Antoine Yates was arrested and sentenced to five months in prison for reckless endangerment. Ming died in 2019 at Noah’s Lost Ark Exotic Animal Rescue Center in Ohio.

Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said the cougar case “is currently under investigation and no further information is available at this time.”


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Cannae Holdings Shifts to Water Efficient Landscape with Aim to Create a Sustainable Workplace

When Facilities Manager Jim Rainey was tasked with finding ways to implement more sustainable practices in the building he manages, he hatched a plan to replace the property’s water-thirsty grass with a landscape. smart and introduced it to the new management team.

“It was an easy sale. The grass dies every year anyway, and it takes a lot of work to keep it alive, ”said Rainey, who oversees a Cannae Holdings Inc. building on Village Center Circle in Summerlin. Built in 1998, the building’s mature landscape also included shrubs that had seen better days. “After so many years, you can only prune the shrubs before they look like sticks.”

To help offset the costs of the landscape upgrade, Rainey applied for the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) Water Smart Landscapes rebate program, which offers up to $ 3 per square foot for grass replaced by a drip irrigated landscape. The 2,750 square foot conversion has earned landowners a cash incentive of $ 8,250 and saves more than 151,000 gallons of water per year.

“Saving water is a big deal,” Rainey said. In addition to reducing water bills and operating costs for the property, the landscape conversion has also eliminated water wastage caused by over-spraying sprinklers. “On windy days, the wind would just blow the water from the sprinklers onto the grass, wasting water. With drippers around plants and trees, you eliminate water waste and use water more efficiently.

The tenants also expressed their support for improving the landscape. “Everyone is really happy with the result. People said it’s a great place to work, and they’re happy with the change, ”said Rainey.

For homeowners who may be reluctant to remove the grass because it provides greenery or because they don’t know where to start, Rainey noted that desert landscapes can be vibrant and colorful, and they can use plants from the existing landscape. As part of the Village Center Circle upgrade, Rainey has retained dozens of healthy trees and shrubs that continue to provide shade and keep the area surrounding the building lush and green. The aesthetic presentation of the improved landscape includes mature foliage as well as new plants and, of course, drip irrigation.

“You don’t have to start from scratch. What you want to do is capitalize on what you already have and build on that, ”said Rainey, who recommended keeping trees and shrubs healthy. “So you don’t get rid of everything, and at the same time you save water.”

“Jim Rainey is a great example of a champion of water conservation,” said Doug Bennett, conservation director for SNWA. “We need more people like Jim to help homeowners see the benefit of replacing grass with water-efficient landscapes, especially as our community continues to face historic drought and harsh conditions. of shortages that will reduce our community’s water supply by nearly 7 billion gallons by 2022.. “

SNWA has taken important steps to prepare for the scarcity conditions, including building Intake 3 and the lake’s low-level pumping station and storing the unused water in reserve for future use by our community. A new law signed by the governor of Nevada will also help protect the valley’s water supply. Assembly Bill 356 prohibits the use of Colorado River water to irrigate non-functioning sod in streetscapes, medians, parking lots and other lawns not used for recreational purposes. by the end of 2026.

“The amount of water we apply to these areas of decorative turf exceeds the scarcity we face. The solution to balancing our water supply is literally under our feet, ”said Bennett, noting that with the declaration of unprecedented scarcity, business leaders and residents must step up their commitment to conservation. “These efforts will help ensure the long-term economic success of our community.

Find out how you can lower your business operating costs and take advantage of cash incentives by emailing one of SNWA’s business experts at [email protected] or call 702-862-3740.

Members of the Las Vegas Review-Journal editorial and press team were not involved in the creation of this content.



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The historic Newburgh fireworks display will take place on September 4

Usually when we think of fireworks we think of July 4th, but the city of Newburgh has decided to do things a little differently. They recently made the decision to move the annual fireworks display from July 4 to Labor Day weekend. The town of Newburgh cited the unpredictable levels of the river in July as the reason they decided to stop participating in the 4th of July fireworks show and relocate it instead on the holiday weekend. work.

And if you haven’t kept the dates, Labor Day weekend is approaching! It will be here next weekend of September 3-6. If you are looking for something fun to do, the historic Newburgh fireworks display and a night out in the park are definitely an event you should not miss. Here’s what the Facebook event page says about the upcoming fireworks display:

Come and celebrate the end of summer with us on Labour Dar weekend. There will be plenty of food trucks, a beer garden and an Old Dam Band community concert.

The list of food trucks will be published in August.

If you’re coming from out of town, we want to make sure you get to the right place for this year’s festivities! The fireworks are located at the OLD Lock & Dam Park on the riverside in downtown Newburgh.

There will be NO shuttles departing from Newburgh Elementary School or Sharon Elementary School this year.

Park in town and take your time and enjoy the beautiful walk along the river!

Parking suggestions: Street parking, City of Newburgh public parking lots, Newburgh Elementary School, People’s Bank on State Street, Zion UCC (they accept donations to park there)

4:00 p.m. Evening in the park begins at Old Lock & Dam Park
6:00 p.m. Old Dam Band Concert at the Allen Family Amphitheater
7:00 p.m. Proclamations, flag raising and national anthem
8:00 p.m. Fireworks

If you missed watching the fireworks light up the night sky then you will definitely want to make a plan to watch the Newburgh fireworks, they still put on such a good show, and I know this year won’t be different !

WATCH: Here are the pets banned in every state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to the states, some organizations, including the Humane Society of the United States, advocate standardized federal legislation that would prohibit owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets. company.

Read on to see which animals are banned in your home country, as well as across the country.

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest location and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.


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The city center sees development migrate to its east; the Catalyst Campus plans major expansion | New

Started barely six years ago, the Catalyst Campus for Technology and Innovation is jam-packed, triggering an ambitious expansion plan that will cost $ 68 million for infrastructure and redesign of part of the downtown area.

While the American Olympic and Paralympic Museum and Weidner Field sprang up in the southwestern part of downtown, and bars and restaurants lined Tejon Street with apartments popping up all over the heart of the city , not much happened on the east side of the heart.

But this sector could soon take off with hundreds of apartments under construction or in the pipeline, a parking lot under construction and plans taking shape for vacant housing. Gazette building and the former Saint-François hospital.

Now, a proposal from the Catalyst Campus, located in the historic Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe rail depot and related buildings, will further strengthen the east and southeast sides of downtown, said its founder Kevin O’Neil.

Owner of The O’Neil Group Co., O’Neil is an entrepreneur with interests in residential and commercial real estate development and aerospace and cyberspace technology. He also says he is trying to integrate a community development component into his projects, and the Campus Catalyst expansion will do just that.

“We are a community builder instead of a developer,” O’Neil tells the India. “We are trying to improve and clean up the neighborhood. We see a lot of transient behavior there.

The city council was to be informed on August 23, the day the India went to press, but City Council Chairman Tom Strand is excited about the project, and Councilor Bill Murray says via email: “This proposal could help the city expand its technological footprint, which is still weak by compared to most cities.

Catalyst Campus features program areas, executive offices, research and development facilities and meeting spaces. These include the Catalyst Space Accelerator, sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Directorate of Space Vehicles, which promotes commercially augmented technological progress. It has hosted nearly 50 companies around the world and secured more than $ 48 million in follow-up funding from government and private investors. Another is Space CAMP, a software factory focused on the development and deployment of Space Force mission applications for the fighter.

Nestled at the confluence of Pikes Peak and Colorado Avenues on the east side of downtown, the campus has gradually overtaken its facilities, leading O’Neil to propose the creation of two metropolitan districts and a business improvement district. totaling 15 acres.

If approved, the Catalyst BID would be one of the city’s 16 business improvement districts; two more are awaiting approval, according to city records. The city has about 46 metropolitan districts and approvals for 16 more are pending.

Catalyst Districts would tax up to 50 vintages on property tax bills to fund expansion and 10 mills for operations and administration. Districts could also adopt a public improvement charge, which is essentially a sales tax.

O’Neil plans to add executive office suites, research and development labs, residential units and, perhaps, a parking garage, increasing the footprint from 220,000 to 1 million square feet.

The work includes upgrading utilities and high-speed fiber to the east side of downtown, an initiative that would benefit surrounding properties, he said, as well as the continuation of the Legacy Loop public trail.

O’Neil said former President Donald Trump’s decision to locate the headquarters of the new space force at Peterson Air Force Base in Huntsville, Ala. – a decision contested by businessmen and local officials – did not will not hinder the development of the aerospace contingent in Colorado. Springs, and the Catalyst Campus plays a key role in this regard.

“We see new programs evolving every day,” he says. “You can’t all go to Huntsville when we’re the space capital. We have the industrial base. With the current workforce working under Space Force that would be redirected to Huntsville, we believe 75 percent of those employees will not be leaving Colorado Springs. We’re fine anyway.

It is because the demand is so great. “We are full and our request is to build something new for customers here and others who want to settle here. “

While the proposal asks for permission to issue up to $ 90 million in bonds to fund the project, it estimates the actual cost to be around $ 68 million. O’Neil says that, assuming Council approves the service plan and the creation of the districts in mid-September, he hopes to market the bonds in November and begin construction next year. (O’Neil admitted he would buy some, if not all of the bonds, although he expected other investors to step in.)

The districts would cut a strip through the old rail yard and stretch from Colorado and Pikes Peak Avenues in the north to Costilla Street in the south, and from Wahsatch Avenue in the west to Shooks Run in the east. It wouldn’t immediately integrate into the adjacent Transit Mix site, although O’Neil says he’s working on buying it. O’Neil’s project would lead to the old Gazette St. Francis Building and Hospital, which are located in the 23-acre GSF Business Improvement District and GSF Metropolitan Districts 1 and 2, controlled by Norwood Development Group.

These three districts plan to issue up to $ 100 million in debt to fund utilities, two parking garages, improved drainage, parks, streetscapes, landscaping and public art. . The redevelopment would bring in townhouses, apartments, a hotel, retail and office space and other commercial uses. Districts have formed and an election is slated for this fall to exempt BID income caps imposed by the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.

Chairman of the Strand Board says the formation of subways and business districts has been an effective tool across the state, in terms of funding, as they create a source of income that allows development to be self-financing.

He notes that the Catalyst campus is “exploding,” so an expansion makes sense and would provide space for defense contractors and create jobs for local college graduates with technical degrees.

UCCS and Pikes Peak Community College recently adopted programs to nurture graduates of the high-tech and aerospace industries, and on August 20, the US Space Force and the University of Colorado announced a new partnership program.

City Councilor Murray said that regardless of the location of the Space Force, O’Neil’s plans could help the city expand its technological profile while, combined with Norwood’s plans, “help anchor that side.” from the city “.

But the project won’t necessarily solve the city-wide lack of cheap broadband, which has made the city a “postal mail destination,” says Murray. That said, he is in favor of the creation of neighborhoods.

Strand says the project and other new developments will force the city to further study its ability to provide municipal services, from transit to police protection.

“In terms of public safety, I am concerned about the Colorado Springs Police Department as we are about 100 less sworn officers than we need,” he says, adding that 80 recruits will be starting an academy this month. this.

“It’s going to create more demand, more businesses, more people, more business, and I’m very worried about that,” he says. While the fire department is “well positioned” in the city center, Strand questions transportation, from the suitability of roads to public transit.

“That’s a good question,” he said. “We’ll have to look at this. ”

From the City of Champions The sightseeing package has started to take hold in recent years, bringing the Olympic and Paralympic Museum to the southwest side, along with Colorado College’s nearly completed football stadium and Robson Arena, the downtown area has seen a boom.

Several new tax districts have been created, particularly near the museum, to finance offices and apartments in height. The city renovated Vermijo Avenue to encourage pedestrian traffic, and the city recently won a $ 1.6 million grant from the Colorado Department of Transportation that is intended for Phase 1 of a project to beautify the street. Tejon Street from Colorado Avenue to Boulder Street. The first phase will focus on two blocks going from Colorado to Kiowa.

Despite the closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, restaurants have opened, bars are buzzing and apartments are growing like weed. Multi-story apartment buildings have been built or are underway throughout the city center, bringing thousands of units to what was once a housing shortage, despite the Citywalk built in 1962 at 417 E. Kiowa St .

333 ECO Apartments in Colorado and Wahsatch have opened in the past two years, while Pikes Peak Plaza Apartments are under construction on three acres at the northwest corner of Prospect Street and Pikes Peak Avenue, including a multi-story parking lot. .

Now, O’Neil’s plans will advance development in this neighborhood.

“We have been following the plans of the O’Neil Group company closely for a long time,” Downtown Partnership CEO Susan Edmondson said via email.

“With O’Neil Group, it’s a win-win because not only are existing properties going to be improved and new spaces built, but with it all comes a highly talented workforce – high paying jobs and growing businesses. growth. This is an incredible opportunity for Downtown, ”she said.

Edmondson adds that his agency planned the transformation a few years ago, thanks to O’Neil’s investment. She says some 1,500 apartments in the downtown southeast quadrant – all east of Nevada Avenue – have recently been completed, under construction, or about to open. She estimates that 3,000 units are completed, under construction or under construction next year across the city center.

Greg Dingrando, public information officer for the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department, said at least 1,000 apartments have been built or licensed since 2016.

“What we see now is the east side of Colorado Springs [Downtown] becomes the cool place, ”says O’Neil. “The number of vertical apartments is more than anywhere else in the city center. The [Catalyst Campus] is doing its part to bring that economy, those jobs and the quality of the streets there. If you go there and see what we’ve been up to over the past five years, you would be amazed.


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Phase 3 of Tempe’s Novus Innovation Corridor Nearly Completed

The Novus Innovation Corridor, a 355-acre planned mixed-use development located on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University, is nearing completion of its third phase. At the time of construction, Novus will include more than 10 million square feet of retail, restaurant, urban residential housing, hotels and offices.

According to ASU’s Seidman Research Institute, the economic impact of developing completed and active projects is estimated at $ 1.86 billion. It is also forecast that 33,734 will be created by 2035 through operations at Novus, with an additional 20,000 temporary construction jobs.


READ ALSO: Here are 5 major projects in downtown Phoenix in pre-development


The land that is being built is owned by ASU in what is called a sports facilities district. Developers within Novus pay fees to ASU instead of property taxes, and these funds must be invested in the university’s sports facilities.

“This is a once in a lifetime opportunity where a university has all of this underutilized land and market demand to create something that will successfully generate income,” said Brian Kearney, senior vice president of development for Catellus – the main developer of Novus – at a lunch hosted by AZCREW.

A new urban center

Development at Novus is planned in four phases. Marina Heights, a 20-acre, 2.1 million-square-foot campus for State Farm, anchored the first phase. Transwestern Investment Group and JDM Parners acquired Marina Heights in 2018 for $ 928 million. The second phase gave the Sun Devil Stadium a $ 375 million renovation, which was completed in 2019. An office park is planned for phase four, on the south side of Rio Salado Parkway and east of Rural Road .

The third phase, currently under construction, focuses on the creation of an urban district at the crossroads of University Drive and Rural Road. Tower 777, developed by Ryan Companies and opened in July 2020, is a six-story building with 160,907 square feet of office space and 8,316 square feet of retail. Mortenson Development built the eight-story, 259-room Hyatt Place / Hyatt House, which began taking reservations in August 2020.

Novus Innovation Corridor Tower 777 won the 2021 RED award for best office project over 150,000 square feet.

In support of the surrounding neighborhood and ASU events, the Novus Place parking garage was completed in June 2020, adding approximately 1,800 parking spaces. “It was a better use of the land to create a centralized parking structure, rather than creating three or four smaller ones for individual uses,” says Kearney.

Projects to be completed in the third phase include the Piedmont, a multi-family structure that will add 318 units to the market when completed in December 2021. Opening in the third quarter of 2023 will be 700 Novus Place, which will be approximately 147,800 feet tall. office squares. and 11,500 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. A new apartment complex developed by Transwestern and slated for completion in the second quarter of 2024 will contain 200 micro-units, with 80% of the studios averaging 450 square feet.

“Most of the units are studio apartments fully furnished with furniture that can convert the space from a bedroom to a living room when there is no sleep,” notes Kearney. “This complex is not intended to accommodate large concentrations of students. Nothing prevents students from renting accommodation and there will be students living in these places, but the idea for Novus in general is not to be student-oriented. It is truly a mixed-use commercial district.

“Development within the Novus Innovation Corridor aligns with our vision to be America’s premier hub for innovation and entrepreneurship at all levels,” said Michael Crow, president of ASU, in a statement. “The benefits to our students, faculty, the university, the city of Tempe and the business community are already being felt – and they will only increase as other visionaries construct new buildings and facilities to deliver. opportunities under Novus. “


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Small Businesses Embrace Electric Vehicle Charging as Blink Deploys IQ 200 Chargers in Massachusetts as Part of MassEVIP Workplace and Fleet Charging Program

Workplace chargers have also been deployed with the Eversource Make-Ready Program incentive funds.

Miami Beach, Florida, August 18, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) (“Blink” or the “Company”), a major owner, operator and supplier of electric vehicles ( EV) charging equipment and services, today announced the deployment of five IQ 200 level 2 AC EV fast-charging stations at Holiday Manufacturing Inc.’s facilities in Framingham, Massachusetts.

The purchase and installation of the host-owned Blink IQ 200 chargers was made possible by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and Eversource (New England’s largest energy supplier), which provided funding to support this deployment through the MassEVIP Workplace and Fleet Charging program, as well as the Eversource Make-Ready program.

“As we continue to grow our market share in the Northeast, we are delighted that small businesses like Holiday Manufacturing understand that the future of transportation is all-electric and have the foresight to roll out our IQ 200 charging stations. EV knowing that they will not fall victim to the planned obsolescence of other Level 2 chargers, ”noted Blink President Brendan Jones. “This agreement demonstrates Holiday Manufacturing’s forward-looking vision and its desire to lead by example by offering its employees and the general public accessible charging for electric vehicles. As one of only three EV charging station locations in Framingham, we commend Holiday Manufacturing for its role in expanding EV charging in the region.

Holiday Manufacturing is a family owned bows and ribbons wholesaler headquartered in Framingham, Massachusetts. She makes handmade bows and ribbons for various occasions and sells them online direct to customers. Like Blink, Holiday Manufacturing is a flexible and agile company that can handle both in-stock and custom orders.

Erik Simon, President of Holiday Manufacturing, commented on the deployment as follows: “We are delighted to offer the public and our staff access to electric vehicle charging with Blink’s IQ 200 chargers. We are committed to reducing our impact on the environment and the deployment of these state-of-the-art electric vehicle chargers in our facilities is an important step towards achieving this goal. “

For the installation of the charging stations, Holiday Manufacturing has upgraded its electrical infrastructure to 100 amp circuits for each charger, allowing it to provide up to 65 miles of range per 1 hour of charge, charging fastest level 2 on the market.

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ABOUT FLASHING CHARGE

Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) is a leader in electric vehicle (EV) charging equipment and has deployed more than 30,000 charging ports in 13 countries, many of which are networked EV charging stations, allowing EV drivers to easily charge at any of the Company’s charging points around the world. Blink Charging’s main product and service line includes its Blink EV (“Blink Network”) charging network, EV charging equipment and EV charging services. The Blink Network uses proprietary, cloud-based software that operates, maintains and tracks grid-connected EV charging stations and associated charging data. With global electric vehicle purchases expected to reach 10 million by 2025, up from around 2 million in 2019, the company has established key strategic partnerships to roll out adoption in many types of locations, including parking lots, multi-family residences and condos, workplaces, healthcare / medical facilities, schools and universities, airports, car dealerships, hotels, municipal mixed-use sites, parks and recreation areas, religious institutions, restaurants, retailers, stadiums, supermarkets and transport centers. For more information, please visit https://www.blinkchargement.com/.

Forward-looking statements
This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements, as well as terms such as “anticipate”, “expect”, “intend”, “may”, “will”, “should” and other comparable terms, involve risks. and uncertainties as they relate to events and depend on circumstances that will occur in the future. These statements include statements regarding the current intention, belief or expectations of Blink Charging and members of its management, as well as the assumptions on which these statements are based. Prospective investors are cautioned that these forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, including those described in Blink Charging’s periodic reports filed with the SEC, and that actual results may differ materially. those contemplated by these forward-looking statements. staring statements. Unless required by federal securities law, Blink Charging assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect changed terms.

Blink media contact
[email protected]

Contact Investor Relations Blink
[email protected]


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Winvic completes its construction program for lease in Milton Keynes

Winvic has completed on Aubrey Place, a 294 rental unit construction program in the heart of Milton Keynes

In January 2020, Packaged Living and Fiera Real Estate, the original owners of the site, signed a financing agreement with Invesco for this purpose-built rental building program.

When completed, the development will include 294 one, two and three bedroom apartments for rent spread over 18 floors.

The development will also benefit from 83 parking spaces, 294 bicycle storage facilities, 2,500 square foot commercial space and 17,324 square feet of indoor and outdoor amenity space, ranging from a reception and from a living room on the ground floor, to the terraces on the roof, to the storage of parcels and to two landscaped courtyards.

An important step for the Almere

Mark Woodrow, Deputy Managing Director of Packaged Living, said: “We are delighted to be a part of The Almere’s closing ceremony – an extremely important program for Packaged Living as the first of our more than 2,000 homes. .

“We thank Winvic for doing a great job under the difficult circumstances of the past year.”

Mark Jones, Multi-Room Director, added: “We are delighted to have reached this milestone despite the unprecedented challenges of the past year.

“I want to commend the team for their hard work and dedication in bringing the project to this point. It’s great to be able to welcome the Packaged Living and Invesco team to the site to enjoy the view from the top of the 18-story building.

Construction of the Almere is expected to be completed in early 2022.


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Real Estate Market Reports Show Slow, Positive Gains

Speculative industrial construction is on the horizon in western Michigan. Meanwhile, retailers are struggling to fill vacancies in the wake of the 2020 pandemic, and many large national businesses are still reluctant to send people back to the office.

The western Michigan industrial market continued to perform well despite the challenges of the past year. According to second quarter reports from NAI Wisinski of West Michigan, the overall vacancy rate stands at 3.3%, which has increased slightly since the end of 2020, which ended at 2.7%.

NAIWWM industry specialist Andrew Kapanowski said the slight increase in the vacancy rate appears to be coming from the southeast Grand Rapids and lake shores submarkets and is most likely due to available speculative construction.

Average rental rates for the second quarter are $ 4.76 per square foot, which is up from the average triple net rental rates of $ 4.28 in the first quarter.

“These numbers are signs of the record demand we are seeing in the western Michigan industrial market and testify to the lack of inventory available for lease,” said Kapanowski. “We expect these rates to remain high until 2021, but should start to stabilize as new construction becomes available and helps meet demand.”

New construction is expected to persist until 2021, as the continued shortage of inventory has kept demand at an all-time high. That said, skyrocketing construction costs are forcing some developers to wait for costs to drop again before launching new projects.

Kapanowski added that many transactions continue to take place off-market, and many of those off-market transactions occur before the signs are released and are based on relationships within the brokerage community. The quality buildings that find their way onto the market tend to disappear quickly, he said.

Notable market activity in the second quarter included the near completion by Mission Design & Automation of a new 50,000 square foot facility at 9898 Black River Court in Holland.

The industrial automation and robotics company has invested more than $ 5 million in the expansion and plans to add at least 109 high-tech jobs in western Michigan. The company receives financial support for vocational training from the Michigan Strategic Fund of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and West Michigan Works !, as well as a 12-year tax exemption for industrial facilities from Holland Charter Township.

Additionally, Autocam Medical, a Kentwood-based global manufacturer of precision surgical and medical devices and components, is investing $ 60 million through 2024 to build a new headquarters and manufacturing facility in Kentwood. The new facility will be 100,000 square feet, located at Broadmoor Avenue and 36th Street, and will be ready for occupancy in January.

After much uncertainty, the second quarter of 2021 is starting to see how the effects of the pandemic and work restrictions have impacted the Grand Rapids office market. More immediate was the concern over the reaction of the office market to the lifting of said work restrictions, which took place during this quarter.

“The parking lots have seen more cars than in the last 15 months, but they are still not ‘full’. Some businesses are back to pre-COVID normalcy, while some are cautiously returning to work in person, and others are still working remotely, ”said Mary Anne Wisinski-Rosely, NAIWWM partner and office specialist. “The trend we’re seeing is that small local businesses are back to the new normal, while many large national / global businesses are still working remotely with limited in-person work.

“Some companies are committed to getting back to the office 100% while others find remote working is possible full time or on a hybrid model.”

Vacancy rates edged up as businesses decided how to proceed. Some gave up their space altogether and others reduced their current location or moved to a smaller space if their lease allowed. There are a few companies that have actually increased their space requirements to better distribute their employees.

In the second quarter, the overall vacancy rate was 6%, up from 5.5% in the first quarter, and the total average rate per square foot was $ 15.58, down slightly from 15.60 $ in the first trimester.

The only market segment that saw a slight decline in vacancy rates was the Southeastern Grand Rapids B&C class market – 6.3% vs. 6% in the first quarter. The suburban markets seem to be doing better than the downtown market in general. In addition, rental rates increased slightly in all sectors except the NW office market which saw rental rates decline slightly.

Vitreo-Retinal Associates, an ophthalmology practice providing eye care services in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Muskegon and Ionia, in June announced plans to double its Kalamazoo space in 2022. Currently located in 4,800 square feet of space at 1080 N. 10th St., the new location will be a new single-tenant building at 1060 N. 10th St. in the West Pointe office park.

MCPc will also move to 1601 Madison Ave. SE in 2022. The Cleveland-based technology logistics and data security company will replace the building that has been vacant for decades and opened the new project in July. This move to the heart of Madison Square is expected to create around 100 new jobs in the local community.

By far the hardest hit industry during the 2020 pandemic, retail is now gaining momentum in the second quarter, but that momentum is hampered by a lack of employees. Retail businesses, in many cases, offer more than minimum wage and signing bonuses to attract much-needed help. Some restaurants still offer take-out or have very limited hours because they don’t have the staff to meet consumer demand.

“The good news is that rental activity in our market is on the rise,” said Bob Lotzar, senior vice president and retail specialist for NAIWWM. “The demand for smaller retail spaces has increased dramatically over the past month. Western Michigan is also seeing national retailers entering our market for the first time. “

The overall vacancy rate is 7.4% and the average demand rate is $ 10.52 per square foot. These numbers are virtually unchanged from the first quarter, when the overall vacancy rate was the same and the average demand rate was $ 10.46 per square foot.

Whole Foods is under construction on 28th Street SE across from Woodland Mall. Ross Dress for Less is currently reviewing sites in Grand Rapids for the first time. Other retailers, such as Tropical Smoothie Café and B2 Outlet Stores, are looking to expand into the local market.

Quality Class A space is hard to find in the most important retail corridors, Lotzar said. The spaces available are still at pre-COVID rental rates. Momentum in the western Michigan retail sector is likely to continue to build up through the end of the year, but will depend somewhat on the ability of business owners to fill vacancies. .

Grove, the gourmet farm-to-table restaurant of the Essence Restaurant group, will reopen this fall. Located at 919 Cherry St. SE, Grove has been closed due to COVID-19. During the closure it was converted to a temporary take-out chicken outlet and later a private food court. When it reopens, Grove will have a refreshed interior and a new menu with 13 to 15 daily seasonal dishes.

Sparrows Coffee, a Grand Rapids-based coffee shop, is opening a new location at Kingma’s Market in the Creston / Cheshire Village neighborhood (2225 Plainfield Ave. NE). The new store measures approximately 600 square feet and offers a large outdoor patio. Sparrows is open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Sparrows will also partner with local suppliers such as Rise Bakery, Lively Up Kombucha and Atucún Chocolate.


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